Golfer’s Elbow Pain Treatments

Many golfer’s elbow pain conditions can be treated through conservative methods, but some may require surgery to effectively relieve pain and restore function to the joint. Your doctor will decide which type of treatment is best for you after a thorough evaluation of your condition. Contact Us Today

Golfer’s Elbow Pain Treatments in Wayne, Paramus, and Englewood, New Jersey

As many of our patients know, golfer’s elbow is not just experienced by those who play golf. A condition often caused by activities that promote repetitive motions, many athletes and hardworking individuals alike are prone to golfer’s elbow pain. Patients in Wayne, Paramus, and Englewood, NJ can find relief for this and other conditions from the team at High Mountain Orthopedics.

Golfer’s Elbow Causes and Symptoms

Golfer’s elbow, or medial epicondylitis, is a form of elbow tendonitis. It affects the tendons that are used to move your fingers and wrist. The pain and discomfort experienced can radiate from your elbow down through your forearm, making everyday tasks difficult.  Although tennis elbow may feel similar, golfer’s elbow differs in that the affected tendons are on the inside of the elbow, rather than the outside.

Typically, golfer’s elbow is a result of the excessive force used to bend the wrist inward. Constant gripping and flexing, or swinging equipment, results in small overextensions and puts excess stress on the area. This condition affects several individuals, including:

  • Athletes who rely on their forearms for power, such as those who use a club, racket, bat, or any other sporting equipment
  • Those who frequently handle weighted objects during manual labor
  • Construction workers who perform physical labor, such as hammering, sawing, or any other activities

The pain you’ll experience as a result of golfer’s elbow can come on gradually or appear suddenly and may only flare up with repetitive stress movements. Additional symptoms patients experience may include:

  • Numbness and tingling in the pinky and ring finger
  • Stiffness in the elbow joint
  • Tenderness along the inner portion of your elbow and/or forearm
  • Weakness in the hands and wrists

Treatments for Golfer’s Elbow at High Mountain Orthopedics

At High Mountain Orthopedics, our medical professionals offer both surgical and non-surgical treatments for golfer’s elbow. Our team will work with you to first explore conservative treatments that may help ease your condition. Oftentimes, symptoms can be alleviated using anti-inflammatory medications as well as:

  • Allowing the muscles to rest and recover
  • Applying ice to the inflamed areas
  • Using a brace to stabilize the injury
  • Physical therapy to rehabilitate the muscles

However, there are some cases where the best course of action is surgery. Elbow arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure used by surgeons to examine, diagnose, and repair joint issues. Benefits of this method include quicker recovery times and less pain. Other surgical options your doctor may recommend include:

  • Tendon repair: During this procedure, your surgeon repairs tendon damage in the affected area.
  • Ulnar nerve transposition: Used to relieve pain, tingling, and numbness or when muscle weakness is an issue, this procedure involves moving the nerve away from the bony part of your elbow to alleviate the condition.
  • Total elbow replacement: If the damage is severe enough and presents in conjunction with other issues, your doctor may recommend a full elbow replacement to help you regain use of the joint.

Schedule an Appointment at High Mountain Orthopedics

If you’re a competitive athlete or a hardworking individual, golfer’s elbow pain can be treated at High Mountain Orthopedics using the most innovative methods available. We serve patients throughout Wayne, Paramus, and Englewood, NJ. Get started by contacting us for an appointment today.

Schedule An Appointment Today!

If you or someone you know is in pain, we can help. Take the first step and schedule an appointment.

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